Category Archives: Poetry

REBLOGGED: WYSIWYG Classics, Or: Making Roman diversity visible, audible, and accessible for 21st century audiences

This blog post was originally published on CUCD-EDI. I am grateful to Elena Giusti and Victoria Leonhard for both their invaluable support and permission to re-blog! Image credit:  Fabien Dany – http://www.fabiendany.com What do we want to see (and do … Continue reading

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Bringing the Roman world back to life, one lap-dog at a time!

Read an interview with María Limón, Xavier Espluga, and myself about this video here: http://blogs.reading.ac.uk/classics-at-reading/2021/04/30/what-can-a-dog-called-margarita-teach-us-about-ancient-rome-education-in-the-making/ I wrote about this inscription (and inscriptions for dogs) before – find out more here: The Master and Margarita The lapidary poetics of Roman domestic … Continue reading

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Freedom of Suppress

Having watched a few episodes of the daily POTUS press briefing screechorama recently, I was reminded of a particular gem among the fables of Phaedrus. The piece is called Simius Tyrannus, King Ape. Its text, somewhat unusually surviving in prose … Continue reading

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Hydroxychloroquine

On March 21st, 2020, the President of the United States revealed that his tremendous capacities also stretched to the field of medicine: More recently, medical studies would appear to suggest that hydroxychloroquine is only marginally more effective than anthonyquine when … Continue reading

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Social Distancing, Phoenix-style

Of all bizarre creatures in that imaginary space that is Greco-Roman myth, Phoenix, the fabled, long-lived, cyclically re-born bird that knows how to go out (and come back in) with a bang, has to be one of the most remarkable … Continue reading

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I am bored, you are bored, all aboard…

The second most contagious thing in the world right now, after the new coronavirus, is the insight that ‘social distancing’, previously known as ‘staying at home’ and ‘stay the fxxx away from me, you creep’, may actually help to decelerate … Continue reading

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Herd immunity

As the UK’s ‘herd immunity’ approach to the coronavirus crisis has proven to be somewhat of a debacle, I would like to share how the farmer Sagaris protected his herd during an epidemic. His story is recorded in a Greek … Continue reading

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Io, Saturnalia? Merry Happy Whatever!

Few ancient exclamations inspire the internet as much as io Saturnalia, allegedly shouted by the Romans in the streets during their celebration of the Saturnalia (and as it is December 18th today as I write this, we are already bang … Continue reading

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Gory, gruesome, and grotesque: two ancient vampire tales

It is Hallowe’en today, and as I have not blogged much recently, a post appearing on here on this very occasion must feel like someone has returned from the dead just in time for this ominous date . . . … Continue reading

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Strength, achievement, and token gestures

Phaedrus, a writer of fables in the style of Aesop in the first century A. D., tells the following tale (Phaedrus 4.17, transl. B. E. Perry): De capris barbatis Barbam capellae cum impetrassent ab Iove, hirci maerentes indignari coeperunt quod … Continue reading

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